4 A/B Tests on Your Call-To-Action Buttons You Really Need to Try

A/B Testing

Put on your helmet. Strap on your boots. Get ready to rumble because your manager has a mission for you:

  • “Get more conversions from our website without making too many changes to it. ASAP, please”

In other words…make the website do better without, you know, doing much to it.

Now, there are some options available to you:

All of which can yield results.

But if you want to make a quick, measurable impact (and in the process, really wow your boss), you should run the following A/B tests on the most crucial element of any website:

Your calls-to-action (CTA).

A quick refresher on why your CTA is such a big deal

Your call-to-action (CTA) button is the most important element on your website. End of story.

When done right, it tells people:

  • What to do.
  • When to do it.
  • What to expect.

So you may have to run a few A/B tests to find a CTA that works best for your business needs.

Red Submit Button1. Test the text

IMPORTANT NOTE: If your current CTA says “SUBMIT”, please change it ASAP. Nobody likes to “SUBMIT” to anything and it’s not doing your business any favours.

Your CTA copy button is incredibly influential; meaning you can (and should) test various aspects of it:

  • Make it longer…or shorter.
  • Use adjectives and verbs.
  • Pack it with power words.
  • Elicit an emotion (anger, frustration, annoyance, etc.).

There’s more to this than simply changing “START NOW” to “BEGIN NOW”. You should tap into why people visit your site.

What problems are they looking to solve? What roadblocks are in their way? How can you help them?

And then, communicate that into an easy-to-read, eye-catching button.

2. Test the colour

Sometimes a red button beats a blue button.

Sometimes a green button beats an orange button.

The only way you can know for sure is to test ‘em.

The beauty of this test is twofold:

  • Running it is simple. Just change the colour of the button, measure the results, and determine a winner.
  • Explaining it to your manager is also simple. “Boss, we’re gonna change the colour of the button and see which colour people like better. That’s it.”

3. Test the location

Where’s your CTA button right now?

And, more importantly, why is it there?

The justification for placing it above the fold is that people need to see it immediately as soon as they hit your page.

The justification for sticking it at the bottom of a page is to allow people to read all your great content and be so excited when they reach the end they just have to click it.

Move your CTA button around:

  1. Up.
  2. Down.
  3. Left.
  4. Right.

Or have multiple CTA buttons in multiple locations.

Explore its relationship with the text on the page. Is there a compelling piece of content that leads nicely into your CTA?

Should it be at the end of a paragraph? Indented at the beginning? Even in the middle of a single section of text?

Brush font

4. Test the fontTattoo font

Did you know there are over 700 different fonts available?

Now, you don’t need to test every single font type out there (you’d go mad otherwise).

But, you should examine the current font of your CTA button and ask yourself:

  • Does it complement the font selection used in the copy?
  • If it was made smaller; would it be too hard to read?
  • If serifs were added to it, would that look better?
  • Should the font be the same as the web content?

Before changing Franklin Gothic Book to Malgun Gothic, you should consult with an experienced web designer.

The last thing you want to do is create such an odd mix that it becomes off-putting and messes up the structure of your landing page being tested.

One more thing: If you have a bunch of fonts you’d like to check out, feel free to run an A/B/C/D test.

Puzzled man

How should you test?

Now that you know what to test, you need to determine how to test them.

Will you…?

  • Use specialized A/B testing software programs?
  • Run test and control campaigns in Google analytics?
  • Rely on public A/B testing forums?
  • Establish parameters (i.e people from one geographic area sees version “A”, another area sees version “B”; Version “A” runs for 12 hours, then version “B” runs for another 12 hours)

There are many factors you need to consider before you begin testing your CTA buttons.

If you don’t choose the right ones (or if you aren’t sure how to interpret the data), you could get some misleading information about your test results.

And that ain’t good.

Test….and keep testing

The results of A/B tests are never meant to be permanent.

They can guide your web design efforts for a little while. But eventually, you’ll need to test your calls-to-action again.

Just because an orange button which reads “SUBSCRIBE NOW” does well today, doesn’t mean it’ll do well in 6 months.

So, as you develop the marketing plan for your business, always allocate time and resources for A/B testing.

If you do it proactively, you won’t have to worry about squeezing it in (especially during a busy time where you’d rather not be testing).

Plus, your boss will love the proactive foresight you display in planning ahead for A/B tests.

winner

We’ll run the test…you get the glory

You know the importance of your CTA buttons.

And you know the value of running A/B tests.

In fact, the two go together like PB& J.

So, if you’re looking for help running a simple A/B test on your calls-to-action (or want to do something more dramatic), we want you to tell us.

No matter what you want to test – or for how long – we can plan it, execute it, and monitor it for you.

We’ll do the work. And if your test idea does well (which it should, because you’re awesome), you’ll get the glory.

Ready?

Contact Us for a Free, No Obligation Introductory Chat

You tell us what you want from your web company and we’ll show you how our team delivers it.